Tuesday, June 12, 2018

Continentals on the March -A Daring Move?



Baron De Kalb directs traffic as his army is on the march.

I set up several "posed" pictures after I finished the Battle of Kingston, from the American Revolution, and wanted to post them on this blog. Continental troops are marching through a town that could be Kingston or another town in the South Carolina Campaign of 1780.

We are on Turn Eleven of Twelve in the campaign and the British have opened up a large differential in Victory Point over the Americans. Desperate times call for desperate measures. With Cornwallis near the Atlantic Ocean at Kingston, the British base in the interior of South Carolina at Camden might be vulnerable to a surprise attack. General De Kalb proposes to attack the Camden garrison (6SPs commanded by Lord Rawdon) with at least 6SPs of veteran Continental troops. 

Following the defeat and capture of Gates' army at Kingston, De Kalb commands the last Continental Army of any significance in South Carolina. So this is a very bold move by the American command, which cannot afford to lose a battle and a lot of men.


The veteran Maryland Brigade leads the column through one of the towns along the route.


A closer view of DeKalb directing traffic. Where are they headed to?
Continental light troops protect the wagon train.


The rear guard.

I am off to Warwickshire in the UK next week, so the Battle of Camden will have to wait to be played until I get back in the final week of June. The battle should be quite a cracker.

6 comments:

  1. Just a thought I had, should the Americans receive a victory point (or two?) every campaign turn just for not losing the campaign? Puts pressure on the British player to act and represent the loss of will on the part of the British government/people. It's kind of how Washington prosecuted the war. The most important thing is to keep an army in the field.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Excellent pictures, Jim. it looks like a tough bunch of men for a hard job! I very much like the skirmisher bases, and the vignettes, too, especially the preacher "converting" the camp followers - or is that the other way round! :-D. An interesting supply wagon. Can you recall what make it is, please? Have a great trip...visiting anyone we know? Cheers, Rohan.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. All of my wagons were made by Ed Philips from card and balsa.

      Delete
  3. Tremendous Jim. I’ve just sold my entire AWI collection and maybe will have to replace with F and D one day.......

    Safe trip over the Pond and see you a week Friday.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Excellent photos Jim. Those buildings are beautiful and well worthy of the close-up treatment. A photo-shop job on any of them and they could be real! See you in just over a week. Chris

    ReplyDelete
  5. Great photo's. I like the use of a backdrop, it works really well.

    ReplyDelete